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the pain of sobriety – or sobriety sucks2004-06-19T19:18:20-08:00

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)
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  • Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 2

    Hi Felicia,
    For me the first six months were the worst. Dan has a very good suggestion. Have a plan in place, before the craving comes. Kepp the mind and body active so they are too busy to notice. Have a phone numbers available for when you need to talk to someone.Exercise is good to keep you occupied as well. It could be as simple as taking a walk.
    Take it a day attime or break it down as simply as a minute at atime. Remember you only have to go through it once. You could ask your doctor for meds if theyt are just so bad you can’t get through it.
    I’ve been sober two years now and it does get easier as you find your way of coping with the desires. Know that you aren’t alone in the fight, we are all pulling for you. Realize what may trigger them and avoiud the situation as best as you can.
    Good luck and be strong. Aladinsane

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 373

    Thats it Felicia we must concentrate on what we have control over. We have to work on this one day on a time. Glad you made the decision not to drink yesterday. Hope that you also had the same sucess today!

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 7

    “Without growth there would be no growing pains…” my 1st and 2nd sponsors told me. When times feel hard, or to much to bare I have come to understand (in my own experience) #1) My Higher Power is sending me a message, #2) There is some change going on and I may not even be aware of it–and my Higher Power is making me aware of that which I am not.
    My first year of soberiety was made of more changes than I knew what or how to deal with–it was in that first year that I came to rely on my Higher Power and be aware of the messages, growth and looking closer at things than I had ever looked before.
    I have heared many things about the first year of soberiety–for me it was all about me and my Higher Power’s relationship. Lots of change, lots of growth–and yes growing pains that went along with it. Every path is different, and the experiences each of us have in the first year as different as fingerprints–yet it all comes down to one thing, JUST FOR TODAY, ONE DAY AT A TIME, ONE FOOT IN FRONT OF THE OTHER…what happened for me living the 24 hour program, only 24 hours at a time, made way for me to appreciate life, others and the diversity that surrounds all of us in so many ways.

    You are in my thoughts and prayers… :banana: (I love the dancing banana)

    LoneFIREWalkingHorse

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 7

    :jail Question…Is soberiety a prison, or a key to freedom? :headbange

    The key to my freedom was getting to know the person inside me who has never has a chance to be because I was not giving myself the chance. I surrendered, gave myself a chance, and discovered I was not the person I thought I was, or the person I once thought I was–now I am free to be me and not care what others think about me. My prison was what I put myself in while drinking and drugging–the key to freedom was to stop fighting, surrender, and the doors of destiney opened wide. The light was bright, and my Higher Power has guided me with faith, understanding and love–with my sponsors, meetings, steps, and finally the relief I did not or have to do this alone.

    Prayers and Blessing to all who read this.

    LoneFIREWalkingHorse

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 2438

    Stick with it Felicia, I’ve been blessed with an amazingly fantastic first year!

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 3

    Great stuff! I like when you say I am free to be me and not care of what others think of me – this was (and still is) one of my biggest problems. I always worry about what other people think of me – but the longer I stay sober, the less I worry of what other people think of me – perhaps I am getting a bit of respect for myself, finally!

    Thanks again from Felicia.

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 99

    hey Felicia – I have been sober for almost nine months now and my pattern was drinking wayyyy too much wine, primarily on weekends. It took outpatient treatment and AA meetings to get me sober.

    One other thing that helped me was to buy a few books on recovery. Just go to Borders or Barnes and Noble and take a look. I learned a lot about the biochemical, genetic and common problems we face during recovery.

    One guy in treatment had been sober for nearly ten years, started drinking that O’douls crap and next thing he knew had a DUI and was back in treatment. I learned a lot from him, that’s for sure!

    Stay away from the triggers – the bars, certain parties, etc, you know what I mean. Working out at the gym helps relieve stress also.

    And check back here often! Take care, Dave

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 1

    greetings! this is my first time on this website. I am a weekend alcoholic. I desperately want my weekends back. I have doubts that I can handle it though. I went to an AA meeting tonight. I really did not feel like anyone cared. I was sober for 9 years until my 15 year old daughter came home and told me she was pregnant. That was almost 8 years ago. I need some encouragement. Thanks!!!!!!!

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 74

    I find that remaining vigilant, working the 12 steps, truely working them with my sponsor, freedom is coming easier and I am not worried about who I am. I have been around for 17 years trying to get clean. Along the way, I’ve had 2 1/2, 4 and 7 years at a time. Each time that I went back to misery, I stopped doing meetings, 12 step work, talking with my sponsor and recovering friends.

    This is a simple path, but sometimes its not easy. I do work my butt off to get through each day. At first step work is done to keep from using, after a while step work is for spiritual principles, to better our way of life. I am grateful today and have truely found freedom from active addiction. Through God, the 12 steps, other addicts, meetings, of course Addiction to Rehabilitation, I have found a better way of life.

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 1

    @LnFRWngHrs_30 254201 wrote:

    :jail Question…Is soberiety a prison, or a key to freedom? :headbange

    The key to my freedom was getting to know the person inside me who has never has a chance to be because I was not giving myself the chance. I surrendered, gave myself a chance, and discovered I was not the person I thought I was, or the person I once thought I was–now I am free to be me and not care what others think about me. My prison was what I put myself in while drinking and drugging–the key to freedom was to stop fighting, surrender, and the doors of destiney opened wide. The light was bright, and my Higher Power has guided me with faith, understanding and love–with my sponsors, meetings, steps, and finally the relief I did not or have to do this alone.

    Prayers and Blessing to all who read this.

    LoneFIREWalkingHorse

    Wow. REALLY inspirational. Thank you for this post. I really appreciate the first line and it makes me rethink my position on sobriety altogether.

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 7

    FLOWERS…I am grateful to see you reaching out—this is so proof prayers work. Do what the oldtimers say–“IF YOUR A$$ FALLS OFF DON’T DRINK–PICK UP YOUR A$$ AND TAKE IT TO A MEETING–GO ONLY IF YOU ARE TAKING YOUR BOOTY TO A MEETING, IT IS SURE TO GET YOU IN THERE–ITS YOUR A$$…”

    I am no oldtimer, just a have-sometime-timer (4 yrs)–I was witness to something that would normally send people over the edge–in recovery, a very violent crime–I have learned nothing is worth drinking or using over, I would just be calling the tiger up from its sleep, and using it as an excuse.

    And since you have had 15 years before I am sure you have heared this, and it applies to me as well….”IF I CAN GET THIS RECOVERY THING JUST 24 HOURS AT A TIME–ANYONE CAN…just have to want it BAD enough.”

    Prayers and Blessing LoneFIREWalkingHorse

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 2438

    Hugs Ladies!! I hope you will join us at the ladies meeting on Thursday’s if your able to attend! Stay strong.

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 3

    Yeah, I guess you are right. I have had a massive relapse – just coming out of it. The pain and suffering is bad, but I wish I could honestly say that in 3 month time!
    Wish you all the best – as fellow sufferer.
    Felica

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 70

    Felicia, what improves will depend on what work you do to improve your insides. Are you doing any work to get better? No one says that life is all what we want every day. That is not any different after you cease consumption of your drug of choice.

    If you really like something and you give it up, wouldn’t you expect to think about it longingly for some time? Of course. So it is with recovery. This is a big reason why you have to be working a recovery program. If you plan to stay sober and happy, you better have a plan. If you have one, you can’t get better if you don’t follow the plan.

    Yes, I thought about drinking and consuming cocaine after I stopped. I have ten years sobriety and it got better over the years. Life was full of challenges, but relapse was never an option to those challenges. It is easy to relapse and tell everyone you did. The bravery is in NOT relapsing in the face of challenges. Yes, you will yearn for your drug of choice, but that goes away. But don’t just sit there and feel sorry for yourself, or you will be telling everyone you went back out to do more research for those of us who are still sober. All challenges are opportunities for something positive for you, if you treat them that way. Even craving your drug of choice. Do not waste this opportunity.

    :sink

    Anonymous
    Inactive
    Post count: 13

    The pain of sobriety is not nearly as bad as the pain and suffering I feel when I binge drink. I did it again this weekend and feel horrible right now.

    I called my sponser and will meet him at an AA meeting tonight.

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